Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Mission Canyon (Mississippian) Reservoir Study, Whitney Canyon-Carter Creek Field, Southwestern Wyoming

By
P. M. Harris
P. M. Harris
Chevron Oil Field Research Company, La Habra, California 90631
Search for other works by this author on:
P. E. Flynn
P. E. Flynn
Search for other works by this author on:
J. L. Sieverding
J. L. Sieverding
Chevron U.S.A., Inc., Northern Region, Denver, Colorado 80111
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 1988

Abstract

Geologic data from conventional cores and wireline logs have been used to better understand the controls on reservoir-quality porosity within the Mission Canyon formation of Whitney Canyon-Carter Creek Field.

The Mission Canyon Formation (Madison Limestone Group) is a thick, regressive sequence that has been subdivided by previous workers into three major stratigraphic units: (1) a lower section of very fine-grained, black to dark gray limestone and dolomite deposited in a starved, anaerobic basin; (2) a middle "main" porosity zone of dolomite and limestone that accumulated on an oxygenated shelf; and (3) an upper fractured and brecciated section of sabkha dolomite and anhydrite. The upper unit was extensively altered during subsequent solution brecciation. All three stratigraphic units were observed in cores from the field, but the middle section was studied in most detail.

Most Mission Canyon production in Whitney Canyon-Carter Creek Field occurs from porous dolomites of the middle "main" producing zone. This section is 300 to 350 feet thick and consists of porous dolomites interbedded with tight, finely crystalline calcitic dolomites or tight lime grainstones. The reservoir dolomites contain intercrystalline, moldic, fracture, and vug porosities. The best reservoir intervals have skeletal-moldie and intercrystalline porosities of greater than 9% and permeabilities exceeding 0.7 md. Although the earliest stages of diagenesis seem to have created the pprosity patterns observed in the reservoir, the carbonates were intensely stylolitized and fractured during burial and subsequent thrusting. Porosity was partially filled with later-stage calcite and anhydrite cements that are possibly related to fracturing.

A similar vertical succession of facies was recognized in all of the cores. The wells are oriented roughly parallel to depositional strike of the facies and little variation occurred in that direction; therefore, the facies and porous dolomite zones are correlated easily where faults or other structural problems do not limit communication. Good stratigraphie horizontal communication apparently exists throughout the reservoir as only minor rock variability and differential cementation are present along layers. Vertical communication may be restricted by thin, tight limestone layers.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

SEPM Core Workshop Notes

Giant Oil and Gas Fields: A Core Workshop

Anthony J. Lomando
Anthony J. Lomando
Search for other works by this author on:
Paul M. Harris
Paul M. Harris
Search for other works by this author on:
SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
12
ISBN electronic:
9781565761001
Publication date:
January 01, 1988

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal