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Table 2-1 contains a compilation of abundances of the elements derived from various sources. The basic purpose behind most of these determinations of abundances has been to attempt to find the over-all composition of the solar system. Some of the volatile elements can be found from the solar spectrum; others must be determined from the spectra of type-B stars, which are believed to be similar in composition to the sun. Some of the nonvolatile elements can also be determined from the solar spectrum, usually with rather low accuracy. Commonly the relative abundances of these elements are better determined from chondritic meteorites, in which not much fractionation of the nonvolatile elements appears to have taken place. Elements in the earth's crust seem to have been fractionated and concentrated to such an extent that it is exceedingly difficult to determine the average abundances and virtually impossible to draw any useful conclusions about the unfractionated abundances, except in a few cases. Meteorites other than chondrites, and certain peculiar classes of stars, may have very different compositions from those listed in Table 2-1.

T ABLE 2 - 1. C OMPILATIONS OF A BUNDANCES

Atomic no.   Element   Suess–Urey   Cameron   Clayton–Fowler   Chondrites   Sun   B stars  
4.00 × 1010   3.2 × 1010   . .  . .  3.2 × 1010   3.6 × 1010  
He  3.08 × 109   2.6 × 109   . .  . .  . .  5.7 × 109  
Li  100  38  . .  38  .29  . . 
Be  20  . .  .64*  7.2  . . 
Atomic no.   Element   Suess–Urey   Cameron   Clayton–Fowler   Chondrites   Sun   B stars  
4.00 × 1010   3.2 × 1010   . .  . .  3.2 × 1010   3.6 × 1010  
He  3.08 × 109   2.6 × 109   . .  . .  . .  5.7 × 109  
Li  100  38  . .  38  .29  . . 
Be  20  . .  .64*  7.2  . . 

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