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ISSN 0149-1423
EISSN 1558-9153
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AAPG Bulletin September 01, 2018, Vol.102, 1671-1683. doi:10.1306/01081817264
AAPG Bulletin September 01, 2018, Vol.102, 1685-1702. doi:10.1306/01081817308
AAPG Bulletin September 01, 2018, Vol.102, 1703-1737. doi:10.1306/02061817121
AAPG Bulletin September 01, 2018, Vol.102, 1739-1762. doi:10.1306/01081817063
AAPG Bulletin September 01, 2018, Vol.102, 1763-1802. doi:10.1306/0206181616817222
AAPG Bulletin September 01, 2018, Vol.102, 1803-1824. doi:10.1306/02061817090
AAPG Bulletin September 01, 2018, Vol.102, 1825-1840. doi:10.1306/02271816507
AAPG Bulletin September 01, 2018, Vol.102, 1841-1865. doi:10.1306/02161817234
AAPG Bulletin September 01, 2018, Vol.102, 1867-1892. doi:10.1306/0108181613217061
AAPG Bulletin September 01, 2018, Vol.102, 1893-1910. doi:10.1306/03141817262
  • Cover Image

    Cover Image

    issue cover

    ON COVER – View from a Maori settlement known as a pā overlooking the black-sand Pukearuhe Beach and the Tasman Sea, North Island, New Zealand. Pukearuhe Beach is one of the prime outcrop locales to observe the deep-water slope deposits of the Miocene Mount Messenger Formation and is located approximately 40 km (25 mi) northeast of New Plymouth. This channel–levee and overbank succession is comprised chiefly of turbidites and extends into the subsurface of the Taranaki Basin where it has been a producing interval in several oil and gas fields for decades. Today, the deep-water Miocene outcrops exposed along the coast of the Taranaki Basin serve as valuable analogues for other fine-grained, heterolithic, poorly indurated, litharenite petroleum reservoirs around the world. See related paper by Rotzien et al. on p. 1763 in this issue of the Bulletin.

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