Abstract

This article uses data from well-exposed outcrops and published information to document static connectivity in deep-water channelized systems. Two measures of static reservoir connectivity on outcrop analogs are proposed: margin connectivity and sand-on-sand connectivity. Margin connectivity (Cm) is the length between two stratigraphically adjacent elements not obstructed by a barrier normalized by the total length of the interface. Sand-on-sand connectivity (Cs) is the length of sand-on-sand contacts between two stratigraphically adjacent elements normalized by the total length of the interface.

The Cm and Cs are analyzed with regard to four categories: (1) association of architectural elements, (2) stacking pattern of channel elements, (3) setting on the slope-to-basin profile, and (4) net sand content. Results are as follows. First, connectivity varies by association of architectural elements. Channel-lobe contacts have higher Cm and Cs than channel-channel and channel-levee contacts. Second, connectivity varies by stacking pattern of channel elements. Predominantly vertically stacked channel elements have higher Cm and Cs than predominantly laterally stacked channel elements. Also, disorganized nonsequentially stacked channel elements have higher Cm than organized systematically stacked channel elements. Third, connectivity varies by setting on the slope-to-basin profile. Channel elements in confined settings have higher Cm than both weakly confined and unconfined-distributive settings. Fourth, connectivity varies by net sand content. Channel elements with a high net sand content have higher Cm than those with a low net sand content. Therefore, knowledge of a reservoir's placement in these categories can be used to aid in the prediction of static connectivity.

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