Long, narrow, relatively straight vegetation, soil tonal, and drainage alignments visible on aerial photographs and mosaics have recently attracted the attention of photogeologists. Blanchet (1957) considers these linear features to represent joints or faults and defines “microfractures” as linear features up to 212 miles long, and “macrofractures” as linear features ranging from 2 to 50 miles long. Mollard (1957 a, b) uses “surficial lineament” or “lineament” for these linear features regardless of length. Kupsch and Wild (1958) describe linear features on aerial photographs in Saskatchewan which are the surface expression of faults and which they term “lineaments.”

Hobbs...

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